Kostya, 16, stands in his room in Kramatorsk. He, brother, and his mother and father were forced to flee their home in the nearby town of Charcizk and now live in Kramatorsk in Ukraine's eastern Donetsk province.
       
     
 The lights of different apartments are seen through the windows of a large housing block in Kramatorsk. Kramatorsk has absorbed more than 67,000 people displaced by the conflict that has split much of the Donbass region in eastern Ukraine.
       
     
 Kostya's brother, Artyom, 10, sits at home in his room. "Everything we have done, we have done for our children," says the Artyom and Kostya's father, Sasha.
       
     
 Two TV's rest on the windowsill as another plays in Sasha and Marina's bedroom in Kramatorsk. The family who owns the apartment fled Kramatorsk when the town was occupied by rebels, leaving all their belongings behind. "It's like we are still living somebody else's life," says Sasha of the apartment they live in, "we still don't feel at home."
       
     
 Sasha Dobryi, 41, wakes up as his wife, Marina, 38, prepares breakfast before dawn at their small apartment in Kramatorsk. Both Kostya and Artyom are diabetic and access to medical supplies and proper care were the driving force that compelled the family to leave their home in the self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic (DPR).
       
     
 Sasha walks through a marketplace after buying some supplies for work. "It is hard for me to keep my opinions quiet," he says, “when we last saw our friends in Charcizk the night did not end happily. There was a divide in what we believed."
       
     
 Marina, a Ukrainian language teacher by training, puts on lipstick before heading to her job running an after-school program at a local primary school. Although it took nearly a year, both her and Sasha have finally been able to find work in Kramatorsk.
       
     
 Marina rides the bus to her school. "We feel a constant stress about what is happening back home and how are family is and whether we will be able to return," says Marina , "there is no easy way to settle your mind."
       
     
 Sasha takes a break from work and rests at the entrance of the factory.
       
     
 A dog wanders through the woods on the outskirts of Kramatorsk.
       
     
 Sasha helps a coworker solder metal together in the factory where he works. According to the UN Development Programme, the war in Donbass has affected more than 800,000 jobs and cut Ukraine's 2014 GDP by nearly 3%.
       
     
 Marina works at her desk in the classroom where she runs an after-school program. "It was really difficult to leave," Marina says of saying goodbye to the class of students she had taught for five years in Charcizk,  "I cried everyday."
       
     
 A young man fixes a machine at the metal-working factory. Nearly all of the current employees are men displaced from the conflict.
       
     
 Sasha plays the guitar at the apartment. "We live out of our bags," he says, "we are always ready to go somewhere. We don't have a settled life."
       
     
 A woman walks past a house that was heavily shelled in the nearby town of Slovyansk. An estimated 1.4 million people have been displaced by the war.
       
     
 Kostya paints small model figurines at the apartment. "I live day by day," he says while sitting at his desk one night, "I don't look into the future because your plans usually don't come true."
       
     
 Artyom reaches for something above the computer. "He is still young," says Marina of Artyom, "but I don't want him to grow up without friends."
       
     
 Children ride a merry-go-round in Kramatorsk while a mother watches on.  "We want them to have ordinary lives with their own friends and family," says Marina of her children.
       
     
 Artyom gives himself an injection of insulin.
       
     
 Marina tucks Artyom into bed. "My father said that he started everything four times in his life," she says one night after dinner, "so if it’s needed we will start again."
       
     
 Sasha and Marina listen to their favorite musician on their laptop and take a moment to themselves at the end of the night. They have been married for 20 years.
       
     
 Kostya, 16, stands in his room in Kramatorsk. He, brother, and his mother and father were forced to flee their home in the nearby town of Charcizk and now live in Kramatorsk in Ukraine's eastern Donetsk province.
       
     

Kostya, 16, stands in his room in Kramatorsk. He, brother, and his mother and father were forced to flee their home in the nearby town of Charcizk and now live in Kramatorsk in Ukraine's eastern Donetsk province.

 The lights of different apartments are seen through the windows of a large housing block in Kramatorsk. Kramatorsk has absorbed more than 67,000 people displaced by the conflict that has split much of the Donbass region in eastern Ukraine.
       
     

The lights of different apartments are seen through the windows of a large housing block in Kramatorsk. Kramatorsk has absorbed more than 67,000 people displaced by the conflict that has split much of the Donbass region in eastern Ukraine.

 Kostya's brother, Artyom, 10, sits at home in his room. "Everything we have done, we have done for our children," says the Artyom and Kostya's father, Sasha.
       
     

Kostya's brother, Artyom, 10, sits at home in his room. "Everything we have done, we have done for our children," says the Artyom and Kostya's father, Sasha.

 Two TV's rest on the windowsill as another plays in Sasha and Marina's bedroom in Kramatorsk. The family who owns the apartment fled Kramatorsk when the town was occupied by rebels, leaving all their belongings behind. "It's like we are still living somebody else's life," says Sasha of the apartment they live in, "we still don't feel at home."
       
     

Two TV's rest on the windowsill as another plays in Sasha and Marina's bedroom in Kramatorsk. The family who owns the apartment fled Kramatorsk when the town was occupied by rebels, leaving all their belongings behind. "It's like we are still living somebody else's life," says Sasha of the apartment they live in, "we still don't feel at home."

 Sasha Dobryi, 41, wakes up as his wife, Marina, 38, prepares breakfast before dawn at their small apartment in Kramatorsk. Both Kostya and Artyom are diabetic and access to medical supplies and proper care were the driving force that compelled the family to leave their home in the self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic (DPR).
       
     

Sasha Dobryi, 41, wakes up as his wife, Marina, 38, prepares breakfast before dawn at their small apartment in Kramatorsk. Both Kostya and Artyom are diabetic and access to medical supplies and proper care were the driving force that compelled the family to leave their home in the self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic (DPR).

 Sasha walks through a marketplace after buying some supplies for work. "It is hard for me to keep my opinions quiet," he says, “when we last saw our friends in Charcizk the night did not end happily. There was a divide in what we believed."
       
     

Sasha walks through a marketplace after buying some supplies for work. "It is hard for me to keep my opinions quiet," he says, “when we last saw our friends in Charcizk the night did not end happily. There was a divide in what we believed."

 Marina, a Ukrainian language teacher by training, puts on lipstick before heading to her job running an after-school program at a local primary school. Although it took nearly a year, both her and Sasha have finally been able to find work in Kramatorsk.
       
     

Marina, a Ukrainian language teacher by training, puts on lipstick before heading to her job running an after-school program at a local primary school. Although it took nearly a year, both her and Sasha have finally been able to find work in Kramatorsk.

 Marina rides the bus to her school. "We feel a constant stress about what is happening back home and how are family is and whether we will be able to return," says Marina , "there is no easy way to settle your mind."
       
     

Marina rides the bus to her school. "We feel a constant stress about what is happening back home and how are family is and whether we will be able to return," says Marina , "there is no easy way to settle your mind."

 Sasha takes a break from work and rests at the entrance of the factory.
       
     

Sasha takes a break from work and rests at the entrance of the factory.

 A dog wanders through the woods on the outskirts of Kramatorsk.
       
     

A dog wanders through the woods on the outskirts of Kramatorsk.

 Sasha helps a coworker solder metal together in the factory where he works. According to the UN Development Programme, the war in Donbass has affected more than 800,000 jobs and cut Ukraine's 2014 GDP by nearly 3%.
       
     

Sasha helps a coworker solder metal together in the factory where he works. According to the UN Development Programme, the war in Donbass has affected more than 800,000 jobs and cut Ukraine's 2014 GDP by nearly 3%.

 Marina works at her desk in the classroom where she runs an after-school program. "It was really difficult to leave," Marina says of saying goodbye to the class of students she had taught for five years in Charcizk,  "I cried everyday."
       
     

Marina works at her desk in the classroom where she runs an after-school program. "It was really difficult to leave," Marina says of saying goodbye to the class of students she had taught for five years in Charcizk, "I cried everyday."

 A young man fixes a machine at the metal-working factory. Nearly all of the current employees are men displaced from the conflict.
       
     

A young man fixes a machine at the metal-working factory. Nearly all of the current employees are men displaced from the conflict.

 Sasha plays the guitar at the apartment. "We live out of our bags," he says, "we are always ready to go somewhere. We don't have a settled life."
       
     

Sasha plays the guitar at the apartment. "We live out of our bags," he says, "we are always ready to go somewhere. We don't have a settled life."

 A woman walks past a house that was heavily shelled in the nearby town of Slovyansk. An estimated 1.4 million people have been displaced by the war.
       
     

A woman walks past a house that was heavily shelled in the nearby town of Slovyansk. An estimated 1.4 million people have been displaced by the war.

 Kostya paints small model figurines at the apartment. "I live day by day," he says while sitting at his desk one night, "I don't look into the future because your plans usually don't come true."
       
     

Kostya paints small model figurines at the apartment. "I live day by day," he says while sitting at his desk one night, "I don't look into the future because your plans usually don't come true."

 Artyom reaches for something above the computer. "He is still young," says Marina of Artyom, "but I don't want him to grow up without friends."
       
     

Artyom reaches for something above the computer. "He is still young," says Marina of Artyom, "but I don't want him to grow up without friends."

 Children ride a merry-go-round in Kramatorsk while a mother watches on.  "We want them to have ordinary lives with their own friends and family," says Marina of her children.
       
     

Children ride a merry-go-round in Kramatorsk while a mother watches on. "We want them to have ordinary lives with their own friends and family," says Marina of her children.

 Artyom gives himself an injection of insulin.
       
     

Artyom gives himself an injection of insulin.

 Marina tucks Artyom into bed. "My father said that he started everything four times in his life," she says one night after dinner, "so if it’s needed we will start again."
       
     

Marina tucks Artyom into bed. "My father said that he started everything four times in his life," she says one night after dinner, "so if it’s needed we will start again."

 Sasha and Marina listen to their favorite musician on their laptop and take a moment to themselves at the end of the night. They have been married for 20 years.
       
     

Sasha and Marina listen to their favorite musician on their laptop and take a moment to themselves at the end of the night. They have been married for 20 years.